Posts Tagged ‘detergent’

Faded Glory

February 8, 2011

I own three towels—two bath towels and one hand towel—all soft turquoise blue, all bought at the same time.

They travel together from the linen closet to the hooks on the back of the bathroom door to the washer and dryer and back again. They’re all washed hot, lately with Seventh Generation laundry detergent because I like the Blue Eucalyptus and Lavender scent.

Yet recently I’ve noticed that the three towels no longer match. One has faded to a greenish version of its original self, one is dusted with aqua blue, and the third is going gray.

I still treat them as contemporaries and I always will, but clearly they are aging at different rates.

Then again, don’t we all?


If Only I’d Paid Attention in Chemistry

April 18, 2010

Laundry is science.

I was not a good science student. It was only years—all right, decades—after my disastrous encounter with biology, followed by my utter demise at the hands of chemistry, that I even came close to appreciating how eminently practical and ubiquitous science is in our daily lives. Nowhere is this clearer than in the laundry room.

Which brings me to my recent error.

When Pandora visited the laundry room not too long ago, she came face-to-face with a washer full of suds. Her inconvenience and attendant dismay she blamed (in part) on high-efficiency detergents. But Pandora was wrong.

As a not-very-great man used to say, “Trust, but verify.” I trusted Pandora, and I did not verify; that was my mistake. You never know what you’re going to get from Pandora; she does not deliberately mislead, but she sometimes gets her facts twisted. Knowing this as I do, I was wrong to repeat what she’d said without checking it first.

Here then, a clarification:

High-efficiency detergents are efficient for three reasons:

First, they require substantially less water to do their job—from about one-third to more than two-thirds less water than traditional washers.

Second, they require less soap to achieve the same cleaning performance as traditional detergents. That’s why their compact bottles are fitted with compact caps designed to measure out just the right amount of soap for a load of laundry.

And third, they are designed to be low-sudsing because more suds does not equal more cleaning power. More suds simply equals more suds. (The Soap and Detergent Association would be thrilled if you looked all this stuff up on their website.)

The person who overloaded Pandora’s washer with detergent and left her to clean up the suds could have been any one of our neighbors. One thing is for certain though: It wasn’t a scientist.

If I’d paid attention in chemistry, I could have told Pandora that much. Thanks to the laundry room, I’m paying attention now.

Pandora Visits the Laundry Room

April 6, 2010

There was a minor kerfuffle involving suds in the laundry room the other day. Pandora was outraged.

Pandora is vigilant in her crusade against injustice, which takes many forms. You never know where it’s lurking; you must proceed with caution.

In this instance, injustice came in the form of soap suds spewing from the washers. Someone who’d used the washers before Pandora had overloaded them with detergent—too much for a single wash cycle to accommodate. There were traces of it in the soap dispenser when Pandora loaded her clothes into the washer. Nevertheless, she added more soap for her wash and the washing machine responded by producing more suds. Lots more suds.

Pandora had to wash her clothes a second time just to get rid of the suds. She said she ran them through three wash cycles and they still didn’t come out right. She blamed the machines. She blamed the company that maintains the machines. She blamed the manufacturers of the high-efficiency detergent that, she said, “everyone is using now” (everyone but Pandora). Someone had to be responsible for perpetrating this injustice.

I didn’t want to argue with Pandora so I nodded sympathetically and put my clothes into the washer for a cold delicate cycle. I wiped the soap residue from the dispenser before I started the washer. When the wash cycle was finished, there were no excess suds. I brought the clothes upstairs to hang dry. There might have been trouble lurking in the dryer. Why take the risk?

Pandora does not visit the laundry room often. When she does, it’s a memorable occasion.